Ginnungagap – Come from Afar

For countless millennia, the void of the Ginnungagap was without form, unshaped by life. Slowly at first, then in a rush, the great races of the gods filled the void and created the worlds of mortals.

Travelling slowly from across the Ginnungagap, the gods Buri and Bor found the great sweeping ice cloud home of the Jötnar, and after eventually establishing communication Bor took the Jötunn Bestla for a companion.
Their three offspring, Vili, Ve and Odin, were less willing to engage with their Jötnar cousins, and relations between the races quickly fell into open warfare.

The three travelled deep into the ice cloud and to the far side, where the distant solar winds of the hot stars of Muspelheim laid open a swathe of more temperate systems, inhabited by both Jötnar and their allies the Vanir.
Around one star the brothers found the home of the great Jötunn Ymir, a leader of their race. He had cowed the local Vanir into subservience, and so the Aesir brothers overthrew and destroyed him in their quest for allies.
In a show of strength and power, the three used their combined knowledge and magic to begin changing the star system. They moved the orbits of the worlds and heated the star with their powerful magic.
Eventually breathing life and sentience into the world they most favoured, they created Midgard.

The Vanir were less than impressed, having their worlds moved and awakened by the newcomers, but envoys between the two brokered some peace. The Aesir established a permanent presence in the home system of the Vanir.
After a time, new hostility erupted between these two great tribes of gods. The Vanir took great losses, as they were unused to the tactics of the Aesir, but they were able nevertheless to cause great damage to the defences of the Aesir – after all, the Aesir were unused to the tactics of the Vanir.

A peace was eventually brokered, both recognising their mutual enemy in the Jötnar, and a great cultural exchange began.
It was in these times that much of the life of the Nine Worlds came into being, crafted by the new Æsr Combine.



Classes of the Ginnungagap

I’ve been reading around what other people have worked into sci-fi D&D rules around the internet, and I’ll be pinching and tweaking and fiddling as I go. A good portion of what I’m working with comes from Fifth Age, though I’m going for a lasers and sorcery setting so there’s the thorny issue of magic to work in somehow.

With that in mind, I’ve sat down again with the classes list and decided what I’m keeping and what will go, though I’m still stuck with some difficult decisions. The Fifth Age uses a Technician class to cover a Medic speciality, and I really like the class, but I’m also wanting to keep the Cleric as an option.


So far the classes I’m happy with are:

Barbarian (though I need to look again at which totems fit the setting)


Officer (Fifth Age equivalent to a Bard – thinking about a name change and tweaks. The Ace variant for pilots uses inspiration dice to power their own abilities, but I don’t really like it. I might move it to Soldier and use superiority dice)

Operative (Fifth Age equivalent to a Rogue)

Scout (Re-skin of a Ranger, or possibly the Savage from Fifth Age, or a combination of the two)

Soldier (Re-skin of a Fighter)


Technician (Fifth Age – has variants for Medics, Mechanics, Robomancers, though I’m not sure how happy I am with that last variant)


Classes that might need come in:

Paladin (though I’m working on a Soldier/Fighter speciality that fits this in there. Maybe a reskin of the Eldritch Knight)



Of course, my potential play group is actually only a handful of people so none of this might matter. We’ll see I suppose.